Top 25 toys and tools for sensory seekers (Neurodivergent Adults and Teenagers Edition)

Top 25 toys and tools for sensory seekers (Neurodivergent Adults and Teenagers Edition)

Top 25 toys and tools for sensory seekers (Neurodivergent Adults and Teenagers Edition)

Here are 25 Toys and Tools for Neurodivergent Teenagers & Adults
  1. Fidget Spinners - These small toys are designed to keep fingers busy and provide sensory stimulation through spinning motion.
  2. Tangle Toys - Similar to fidget spinners, tangle toys are made up of multiple interconnected pieces that can be twisted and turned for tactile stimulation.
  3. Chewelry - A combination of the words "chew" and "jewelry", this type of tool is designed for individuals who have a need to chew or bite. It can be worn as a necklace or bracelet.
  4. Weighted Blanket - This type of blanket provides deep pressure stimulation, which can have a calming effect on the nervous system.
  5. Sensory Bottles - Also known as calm down bottles, these are plastic bottles filled with various objects such as glitter, beads, or oil that provide visual and auditory stimulation when shaken.
  6. Noise-cancelling Headphones - For those who are sensitive to noise, these headphones can help block out distractions and create a more peaceful environment.
  7. Fidget Cube - Similar to fidget spinners, the fidget cube has different buttons and switches that can be pressed, flipped, and rotated for sensory stimulation.
  8. Scented Playdough - Traditional playdough with added scents such as lavender or peppermint can provide a multi-sensory experience for individuals who are seeking sensory input.
  9. Therapy Swings - These types of swings provide both proprioceptive and vestibular input through swinging and spinning movements.
  10. Kinetic Sand - This type of sand has a unique texture and is designed to be molded and shaped, providing both tactile and visual stimulation.
  11. Wobble Cushion - A cushion filled with air that can be sat on to provide constant movement and increase proprioceptive input.
  12. Bouncy Bands for Chairs - These elastic bands attach to the legs of chairs and allow for continuous movement while sitting, providing both tactile and vestibular stimulation.
  13. Light Projectors - These devices can project various light patterns onto walls or ceilings, creating a soothing visual experience.
  14. Resistance Bands - Used for resistance training, these bands can also be used for sensory input by stretching, pulling, and manipulating them.
  15. Vibrating Pillows - These pillows have a small vibrating mechanism inside that can provide gentle vibration for tactile stimulation.
  16. Therapy Brushes - Used for brushing the skin, therapy brushes can provide calming sensory input for individuals who are sensitive to touch.
  17. Sensory Mats - These mats have different textures and materials sewn onto them, providing a variety of tactile experiences.
  18. Body Socks - Made of stretchy fabric, body socks provide deep pressure and proprioceptive input by wrapping around the entire body.
  19. Bubble Wrap - Popping bubble wrap can provide both auditory and tactile stimulation for individuals who enjoy the sound and feeling.
  20. Balance Boards - Used for balance training, these boards can also be used as a tool for sensory seekers to get constant movement and vestibular input.
  21. Chewable Pencil Toppers - Similar to chewelry, these silicone pencil toppers provide a safe and discreet way for individuals to satisfy their need to chew on something.
  22. Scented Hand Sanitizers or Lotions - Using scented hand sanitizers or lotions can provide a sensory experience while also promoting hygiene.
  23. Weighted Lap Pad - Similar to a weighted blanket, but smaller and designed to be placed on the lap for sensory input while sitting.
  24. Sensory Bin - A container filled with various materials such as rice, beans, or water beads that provide tactile and visual stimulation for hands-on exploration and play.
  25. DIY Sensory Tools - There are many DIY options for sensory tools such as stress balls made from balloons and rice, or sensory bottles made from empty water bottles and glitter. These can be a more cost-effective option for those on a budget.

In addition to these specific toys and tools, there are many other activities that can provide sensory input for neurodivergent adults and teenagers. Some examples include:

  • Yoga: Practicing yoga poses can provide both proprioceptive and vestibular input, while also promoting relaxation and mindfulness.
  • Dancing: Moving to music can provide a fun and stimulating sensory experience through different types of movements.
  • Gardening: Planting and tending to a garden can provide a variety of tactile experiences through touching dirt, plants, and various textures.
  • Cooking/Baking: Measuring ingredients, stirring, kneading dough, and other cooking or baking tasks can provide sensory input through touch, smell, and taste.
  • Outdoor Activities: Going for a walk in nature, playing outdoor sports, or simply spending time outside can provide a multisensory experience through different sights, sounds, textures, and movements.

It's important to note that every individual has unique sensory needs and preferences. What may work for one person may not work for another. It's important to experiment and find what tools and activities are most beneficial for each individual. Consulting with a therapist or occupational therapist can also provide additional support in finding the right sensory tools and activities.

Lastly, it's important to educate others about sensory processing difficulties and the importance of providing accommodations and understanding for neurodivergent individuals. By creating a more inclusive and understanding environment, we can help individuals with sensory needs thrive in their daily lives. So let's keep seeking out new ways to support and accommodate those who have sensory processing challenges! Let's continue advocating for increased awareness and acceptance of neurodiversity! Together, we can create a world that embraces and celebrates all types of sensory experiences. Happy sensory exploring!

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