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Benefits of Using Sensory Toys and Tools for SPD - High School Edition

Benefits of Using Sensory Toys and Tools for SPD - High School Edition

Benefits of Using Sensory Toys and Tools for SPD - High School Edition Sensory toys are tools designed to stimulate one or more of the five senses - sight, sound, touch, smell, and taste. They provide a unique sensory experience that can help individuals, especially those with sensory processing disorder...
Sensory Tools Checklist for Children with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD)

Sensory Tools Checklist for Children with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD)

Sensory Tools Checklist for Children with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) can affect children in various ways, and each child may have unique needs when it comes to sensory input. To aid parents, caregivers, and educators in supporting children with SPD, we've compiled a comprehensive checklist of...
Top 25 toys and tools for sensory seekers (Neurodivergent Adults and Teenagers Edition)

Top 25 toys and tools for sensory seekers (Neurodivergent Adults and Teenagers Edition)

Top 25 toys and tools for sensory seekers (Neurodivergent Adults and Teenagers Edition) Here are 25 Toys and Tools for Neurodivergent Teenagers & Adults Fidget Spinners - These small toys are designed to keep fingers busy and provide sensory stimulation through spinning motion. Tangle Toys - Similar to fidget spinners,...
Anger Management in Kids - Incorporating the 5 Love Languages

Anger Management in Kids - Incorporating the 5 Love Languages

Anger Management in Kids - Incorporating the 5 Love Languages Let’s talk about anger management. Is your child throwing tantrums? Do they raise their hands to their siblings? Are they expressing emotions through biting their peers? Or are you noticing the beginnings of passive-aggressive behaviors? Anger management is crucial for...

Collection: SENSORY & TACTILE SEEKING

Sensory Seeking: A Dive into Tactile Adventures

The human experience is a symphony of sensations, a medley of inputs that collectively form our perception of the world. Some individuals, however, exhibit a behavior known as sensory seeking, a condition in which the desire for sensory input is heightened, leading to the pursuit of experiences that involve sight, sound, taste, smell, or touch.

In particular, tactile seeking is a fascinating avenue of exploration. It's the tendency to actively search for or crave touch sensations, often manifesting in a preference for certain textures, pressures, or temperatures. Understanding tactile seeking is not only crucial for caregivers, educators, and medical professionals working with individuals who have sensory processing differences, but it also shines a light on the fascinating intricacies of our sensory system.

The Sensory System: More Than Just the Five Senses

The sensory system is vast and intricate, comprising far more than the five 'classic' senses. It encompasses the vestibular and proprioceptive systems, which are about balance and body awareness, respectively, and the tactile system, which governs touch. Each system is interwoven, informing the brain of the external and internal states continuously.

The Allure of Touch

Tactile seeking behavior is the draw towards certain kinds of touch experiences, such as running one's fingers through sand, seeking out tight or confined spaces, or enjoying the pressure of a weighted blanket. It's not about reacting to touch but about actively seeking and craving it.

For individuals who exhibit tactile seeking, touch can be a powerful, sometimes overwhelming, source of comfort, security, and pleasure. These individuals may engage in repetitive touch behaviors called stimming, which can serve a regulatory function to modulate arousal levels or provide a sense of predictability in their environment.

Supporting Tactile Seekers

Understanding and recognizing tactile seeking behaviors is the first step toward providing appropriate support. Individuals who engage in tactile seeking should be given the opportunity to engage with a variety of textures and touch experiences in a safe and controlled manner. Sensory rooms equipped with varied tactile surfaces, tactile activities like finger painting, or even therapeutic touch techniques can be beneficial.

It's essential to remember that what may seem like an odd or excessive fascination with touch for some, is a valid and unique expression of sensory need for tactile seekers. By acknowledging and respecting these needs, we can provide a more inclusive and supportive environment for tactile seekers to thrive.

In the quiet movement of a hand across a textured wall or the gentle rhythm of waves against one's feet, tactile seeking individuals find a dance that resonates deeply with their sensory soul. In recognizing and honoring the significance of tactile experiences, we come to appreciate the rich, resounding, and often unspoken language of touch.